Natalie Prass soothes Chevron Festival Gardens with Soulful Melodies

Photo by Simon Tubey
Photo by Simon Tubey

The performance of Natalie Prass could be described as being a chaotic, audio-visual flow chart of different styles and influences. A mixture of country and blues underlined by her deadpan honesty and banter, it helped ease the time spent between songs and kept the crowd entertained.

Watching Prass perform live was a pleasant surprise, as her live performance included more depth and vividness than any experience a listener could get from a record. Prass is truly one of those performers who are best to catch live, with her record’s only being a taster appetiser of her more vivid live performances.

Photo by Simon Tubey
Photo by Simon Tubey

Prass eased into her set with tracks one a heartbroken base. Laying into “Your Fool”, the first thing which could be noticed was her distinct vocals, which gave a pitch high enough to carry the song during its fleeting moments, yet deep enough to actually retain some form of down-to-earth melodies. Giving off a sense of stylistic versatility, the start of her set also featured a cover of “The Sound of Silence” by Simon and Garfunkel, bringing down the atmosphere of the venue into a sombre and brooding mood.

Photo by Simon Tubey
Photo by Simon Tubey

“Bird of Prey” threw the stage and her band into a more funky light, with an edge of quirkiness coming from the song’s irregular, funky beats and contemplative lyrics. Humorously, the on stage banter was just as interesting as the music, as with the wind picking up on the elevated stage, the band expressed a desire to fly a kite and asked the front row about Perth sightseeing tips. “Jass” was an interesting halfway point between jazz and rock’n’roll, simultaneously smooth as a jazz café track as much as it was a rock anthem, displaying Prass’s talent at working seamlessly across genres.

Lost Mag - Natalie Prass - Simon Tubey-4
Photo by Simon Tubey

The tail end of Prass’s performance emerged to be more grandiose and more emotional with the inclusion of ballads like “Violently”, “Last Time” and “My Baby Don’t Understand Me” adding a nice aspect of symmetry to the performance; having begun and ended with ballads. This slowdown in tempo ultimately built up to a searing finish with a cover of “You Keep Me Hangin’ On” by the Supremes. Tearing into the track with sharp funked up chords from the rhythm guitar and really intrusive rhythm on the drums. Finished on a cheeky and charismatic note, Prass carried off the night with a 1960s showstopper, melding it into a spritely Nashville twist.

Photo by Simon Tubey
Photo by Simon Tubey

Joe Wilson

Joe prides himself on being the only person to consider sparklers in a total fire ban to be a good idea and surviving the 20 minute odyssey from the festival to his campsite at Southbound. He is a regular punter at Perth gigs and has recently picked up the grand title of Master of Reviews at Grok. He also suffers from alcohol-induced multiple personality disorder and has two known alter-egos; Late Night Joe and Chuck.

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